Microwave Puffy Paint

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Well. I’ve seen this technique in different incarnations around Pinterest and the web, so naturally we had to try it. It’s 1. Fun, and 2. Bright.

We used our own recipe, mainly because I misread one of the recipes I found, but it seems like it’s pretty forgiving as long as you have the main ingredients mixed up.

DIY Microwave Puffy Paint Project

Materials:

  • Flour
  • water
  • baking powder
  • salt
  • white cardboard or the equivalent (something sturdier than paper to hold this heavy, wettish goop)
  • food coloring (we used neon gel colors from the baking aisle)
  • microwave
  • plastic sandwich bags

Instructions:

In a bowl, mix 2 cups flour with 2 teaspoons salt and 2 teaspoons baking powder. Mix in just enough water to give it a batter consistency. (You don’t want it to run off the paper when it is squeezed on, but you want to be able to squeeze it out of a small hole in the plastic bags.)

puffy_paint_goop

 

Separate the mixture into 4 plastic sandwich bags, drop food coloring into each bag, a few drops at a time, until desired color. At this point, your child will ask if she can taste it. Let her, because it’s funny to see her face wince in disgust at the saltiness of the concoction.

 

microwave puffy paint

Snip of the teeniest hole from a bottom corner, and use the bags to squeeze the ‘paint onto your surface. I would maybe encourage your kids to not glop this much dough on, because the paint puffs up better in smaller areas….

microwave puffy paint project

 

But then finger swirling started happening, so who cares about the finished product, anyway?

microwave puffy paint

 

Microwave your art for 20-40 seconds, and watch it bake and puff up. This is really the fun part of the whole project.

 

DIY puffy paint

 

DIY puffy paint

Now sit your kids down and explain to them how all that baking powder + salt makes the flour and water rise and get puffy when it’s cooked, just like in baking bread.

Art + science! Together again.

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